Vaping etiquette

Many still do not understand when and where it is kosher for them to vape. E-cigarette brand Vype said more than half of the people surveyed complained they were “baffled”.

Though vaping is now truly mainstream, there’s a lack of official guidelines which does not make vaping universally acceptable.

Other unacceptable times to vape contained vaping in a line, even with a device like a beetlejuice vape pen, in someone’s home but not having their permission, on public transport (planes, trains, automobiles), while someone is cooking and, finally, vaping in bed.

Do ask – most public places like pubs or theaters will have clear policies, but if in doubt – ask.

Do suggest to other vapers you should need to try their best e-liquids for a change in flavor. Perhaps you’ve come across a flavor on the web at a site like vapeliquidness.com that sounds interesting to you. However, don’t request them to share the electronic cigarette itself.

Do not puff away in a restaurant.

Don’t even think about vaping while you’re in a line – consideration for others is key here – no matter how dull it can be waiting in line.

Don’t presume that if you are in a friend’s house or car, you can vape – ask first. It’s polite to take it outside.

Do not blow vapor into someone’s face – while you may love emitting tremendous clouds of sweet-smelling vapor; not all non-vapers will value it.

Don’t vape on board buses, trains or planes – most ban vaping, thus accept it with good humor if you desire to vape and take advantage of the smoking areas.

Never on the rules of vaping in polite society, and definitely not in a restaurant – the fog may have eventually cleared in a queue, or in bed.

Do not assume that hotels permit vaping – better to check when you book.

Don’t be bashful of romance with nonsmokers – according to the research one in five of them would happily date a vaper. That is five times the number who’d consider a date with a smoker.

Chief executive of health charity Ash, Deborah Arnott, says organizations must be clear on the differences between vaping and smoking.

She said: “Vapers need to use common sense and not vape in busy or confined public places, however they ought to not be made to feel uncomfortable or apologetic for vaping.”

“They [non-vapers] should be mindful that the e-cigarettes are used largely by current or ex-smokers to discontinue or prevent relapse back to smoking, and that e-cigarette vapor does not deliver the poisonous load discovered in tobacco smoke.”

When it comes to law, the government views vaping quite differently to smoking – so the smoke-free legislation does not apply to vaping.

Though it is illegal for under-18s to purchase cigarette, there’s no penalty for vaping in the office or in public places, on public transport, in bars or restaurants. Rather, it’s left up to the business or owner to decide.

The debate will continue about vaping’s level of safety. The consensus, though, is that e-cigarettes are “significantly safer” for users than smoking tobacco.